In details

Meet 15 animals with amazing talents


We already know the "common" talents of animals, such as the strength of lions or the speed of cheetahs.

But did you know the ability of spiders to float and skydive? Check out the list below with 15 animals we know and their unknown talents.

Penguins cannot fly, but can jump up to two meters in the air.

A wet dog can shake 70% of its fur water in just four seconds. The secret is its loose skin that travels at three times the speed of a dog's backbone when it shakes, generating nine times more force in drops of water.

Peregrine falcons dive into their prey (usually medium-sized birds) at speeds of up to 322 km / h, attack their targets with their feet, and then catch them in midair. The rest is dinner.

There is a reason why Hollywood did not release the spider version of "Snakes on Board." Arachnids handle air travel very well: They are able to skydive on a silk thread when they want a change of scenery. This process can lead a spider to the next yard or miles away.

Black-swallowed fish from the deep always bite more than they can chew - their stomach can hold prey more than twice its length and 10 times its mass. The fish grabs the victim by the tail, walks its jaws over the entire animal to swallow it whole, and then slowly digests it.

Humans are not the only ones who need sunscreen. Hippos protect your skin by secreting their own sunscreen, a red oil that spreads light to prevent sunburn. The secretion also works as an antibiotic.

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Giraffes produce a potent body odor that enhances their social lives. (Don't try this at home!). Smelly compounds fight fungi and bacteria and even repel ticks. The more a male giraffe stinks, the healthier and more attractive it looks to females.

Hummingbirds can rotate their wings in a complete circle, allowing them to fly forward, backward, sideways, upside down, or just hover in the air.

Rattlesnakes and other jararac snakes have thermal vision, which means they use heat to detect warm-blooded prey. They can feel temperature changes and detect infrared energy. That is, you can not play hide and seek.

Don't let the cute duckbill fool you. The male platypus is one of the few mammals that produces venom similar to snakes, spiders and sea anemones. During mating season, males defend their territory by stinging each other through spurs on their hind legs.

If you can't beat them, confuse them. Arctiidae moths avoid being eaten by bats by listening to the signals of their predators and producing a series of up to 4,500 clicks per second to block their sense of echolocation.

What makes the sepia stand out? Its amazing ability to blend in. In less than a second, the cephalopod can completely change color, texture and pattern using two pigmented sacs called chromatophores and a layer of reflective plates called iridophores. These amazing animals are kings of camouflage.

Tigers use their mustaches for typical feline purposes, such as distance detection. Another use is to check your prey's pulse to see if it's time to stop attacking and start eating.

With a sense of smell seven times stronger than a hunting dog, the gray bear can sniff a possible meal almost 20 miles away and up to 48 hours after the animal has left its scent.

The greatest impersonator in the world is not a Hollywood star. These are the lyre birds that resemble peacocks and have the most advanced vocal cords in the animal kingdom. They act as a walking feather recorder, perfectly memorizing and reproducing ambient sound, other bird songs and even human voices.

Source: ociosocurioso.com.br